Tag Archives: Panasonic GH5

Macro video with the Panasonic gh5

Broadly speaking with the GH5 as well as with any other camera you have four categories of close up work:

  1. Close-up – frame size 10 cm or 4″ and wider typically hand held
  2. Super close-up – frame size 5cm or 2″ preferably on tripod
  3. Macro – frame size below 2″ only on tripod
  4. Super macro – frame size below 1″

For still images a typical choice is the Olympus 60mm, this lens however is very narrow so for any subject that is not too small and for the first category of close up you end up having working distances well above one foot. This in turns means more water to go through and makes it virtually impossible to cover larger subjects.

If you make that choice is because you have skittish subjects that do not like proximity and are very small. Furthermore the Olympus 60mm has not stabilisation and therefore with our GH5 will only use in-body stabilisation. Another side effect of using this lens is that it is impossible to take shots of divers or anything else at medium range so the videos end up being a collection of very close shots that may please someone but result fairly boring.

Of course you can make this kind of video exciting to an extent like here

But at the end for me something like this is more fun although of course the quality is very different (I shot this years ago with a Panasonic LX7 and edited in iMovie)

The difference between the stunning video of Dustin and the basic video of mine is that you only have very close shots in the first one and frankly a slideshow of still images would be equally nice. There is no description of any sort of where is the fish what are the conditions or anything at all. You may argue that the stuff to see is not that nice but at the end this gives you a real idea of the diving where you go which is the purpose of my videos and majority of non Pro people. Furthermore medium size subjects that move like octopus, squids, crabs will almost always exhibit some kind of behaviour.

My macro video rig is built around the Panasonic 14-42 MKII which is the same lens I use for wide angle video with the Nauticam WWL-1. In effect am running video like a compact set up.

GH5 Macro Video Rig as at 29 March 2019

Ergonomics and lens

  1. The field of view with at 42mm is only 23 degrees horizontal and 13 degrees height this is ideal for portrait type of work
  2. I still use my old Sola 1200 video lights that can be used with a 20 degree beam creating a snoot like effect to better isolate your subject. It can be argued that color rendering index of newer lights is better but I think the narrow coverage of the lights is more important. Consider that at wide end the field of view is less than 60 degrees anyway with the flat port at 18mm
  3. I use two close-up lenses with a Saga dual flip diopter
  4. The rig as described is heavy in water more than 700 grams negative to ensure the required stability
  5. The tripod base has 2x 3″ segments and 1x 5″ segment to be as close as possible to the bottom this creates issue if you do not have a monitor as you need to have your face in the sand however once the shot is framed all is good

Close-up lenses

I use two close up lenses with this rig as the 14-42mm as a working distance in water around 26cm and a minimum frame size around 9cm that is pretty wide.

SubSee 5 wet lens

The SubSee 5 is in the sweet spot for the 14-42mm lens because it starts working pretty much when the 14-42mm can-t focus anymore and down to around 10-12 cm working distance. Minimum frame size is 46 mm

SubSee 5 + 14-42@42mm

Using the Ex-Tele feature in video means we can get to 33mm which is below the 36mm classic DSLR 1:1

When this is insufficient and the subjects are really tiny the next lens is the Nauticam CMC-2

Nauticam CMC-2 on Saga dual flip holder

The CMC-2 gives a frame size of 32mm as in this image

Panasonic 14-42@42mm with CMC-2

Using Ex-tele this becomes 23mm which is the same you get with the CMC-1 without ex-tele and is plenty for any purpose. It is theoretically possible to stack the two close up lenses but is not really necessary and the working distance too small. The CMC-2 works around 6-7 cm so you have still space for lights etc.

Olympus 60mm

Is there any use for this lens? Of course there is in case you want to capture a frame smaller than 23mm with the 60mm you can get down to 17mm with the bare lens to 12mm with the Ex tele, 9 mm with the CMC-1 and 6 mm with CMC-1 and ex tele. Will you be able to focus and work with the CMC-2 at 22mm from the subject is another discussion however for skittish subjects it gives you more working distance and this may be needed. I would recommend taking this lens with you for those cases but for video I do not see how you can really use the CMC-1. Please note the CMC-2 is useless with the 60mm as the working distance improvement is minimal to none.

PANASONIC GH5 my underwater still rigs

The Panasonic GH5 is well known to be a great camera for video and I can confirm that see my latest videos

Clearly the camera is fantastic and with the right set up that I will cover in future posts it takes amazing video.

I wanted to start however from photography as the GH5 also takes great still images.

First and foremost macro. In general terms the lens choice of other micro four third also applies to the GH5 so my favourite lens is the Olympus 60mm. Alternatively if you don’t have that lens and you don’t have extremely small subjects you can get good results with a zoom lens I use the Pana 14/42 MKII but other work well too.

In terms of arms strobes nothing changes so my current rig is based on a Nauticam NA-GH5 housing and two Inon Z240. I have each arm set with 1x 8″ and 1x 5″ arm segments you will notice that the longer arms is closer to the camera this because in macro you will usually shoot above the sand so this makes it easier.

For wide angle the situation changes slightly as I use a 12″ arm segment as in the rig below.

GH5 with WWL-1 wet lens and 8+12 arm segments

For wide angle the arms return to a standard situation with shorter segment close to the housing. The same configuration applies if you shoot the 8mm fisheye.

In terms of floatation the GH5 housing is heavy with the 35 macro port is 720 grams and with the fisheye 620 grams. For macro I like my set up to be negative so less floats . For wide angle in case you take slow shutter speed shots I also use the tripod kit for the NA-GH5 this is not as good as a complete tripod but works well in wrecks

In the next posts I will talk about video as here there is a question about diopters and which ones do I use. Lights is also a topic of contention and will discuss few options there too

As always please ask questions if you wish

Panasonic GH5 Demystifying Movie recording settings

 

There are a lot of videos on YouTube that suggest that there is not much difference among the various recording settings of the GH5 for UHD.

To recap we have 4 settings for UHD (I will refer to PAL system because it is easier but all applies equally to 24p, the 30p/60p format will be the same with worse results)

  1. 100 Mbps 420 8 Bits Long GOP 25p
  2. 150 Mbps 420 8 Bits Long GOP 50p
  3. 150 Mbps 422 10 Bits Long GOP 25p
  4. 400 Mbps 422 10 Bits All-Intra 25p

The difference between Long GOP and All Intra is that in the Long GOP what is encoded is a group of pictures (GOP) and not separate individual pictures. In this article I will use ProRes as a proxy to AVC-Intra as, in the GH5 implementation, they have very similar logic and performance you can find some posts on the internet of people trying to discern the two but there really is not difference as essentially this is just image compression. 

Within a Group of Pictures there are different type of frames:

  • I (Intra coded) frames containing a full picture
  • P (Predictive coded) frames containing  motion interpolated picture based on a prediction from previous frames
  • B (bi-predictive coded) frames containing a prediction from previous or future frames

It is important to note that frames are not stored sequentially in a GOP and therefore the GOP needs to be decoded and the frames reordered to be played, this requires processing power.

The reason why H264 is very efficient is that within a group of picture there is only one full frame and the rest are predictions clearly if the prediction algorithm is accurate the level of perceived quality of long GOP is very high and similar to All-Intra clips.

This is the reason why comparing All Intra and Long Gop using static scenes or scenes with repetitive movement that can be predicted very accurately by the codec is a fundamental error.

Incorrect example here:

The scene is composed of static predictable objects with no motion and after YouTube compression the (wrong) conclusion is that there is no absolute difference between the codecs. Instead what this shows is the effectiveness of Long GOP when the prediction is accurate which is exactly the point of the codec plus the fact that YouTube flattens differences due to heavy compression and use of Long GOP.

Another example is a bit better as it uses a fountain which is a good representation of unpredictable motion

In the 300% crop you can see how All_Intra performs better than Long GOP in terms of prediction despite the YouTube compression, but generally those tests are unreliable if you see the last section of the video where there is a semi-static scene you cannot really take the three examples apart.

So why is that and is there any point selecting different settings on your Panasonic GH5?

In order to understand the workings we need to dig deeper into the structure of the GOP but before doing so let’s evaluate the All-Intra codec.

AVC All-Intra explanation

This codec records at 400 Mbps so with 25 fps this means circa 16 Mbits per frame or  1.9 MB per frame and there is no motion interpolation so each frame is independent from the others. The implementation of All-Intra of the GH5 does not make use of CABAC entropy encoding as Panasonic does not believe this is beneficial at higher bit-rates making this AVC-Intra implementation very close to ProRes as both are based on Discrete Cosine Transform.

If you consider a Jpeg image of your 3840×2160 frame on the GH5 you see that it stores around 4.8 MB per image because there is no chroma sub-sampling so if you wanted to have exactly the same result you would need to use ProRes 4444 to get a comparable quality (this not even taking into account that Jpeg are 8 bits images).

Video uses chroma sub-sampling so only part of the frame contain colours at a given time. Apple in their ProRes white paper declare that both ProRes 422 and 422 HQ are adequate to process 10 bit colour depth and 422 sub-sampling however they show some quality differences and different headroom for editing. If you count 50% for 4.2:0 sub-sampling and 67% for 422 you get around 2.34 MB and 3.5 MB frame sizes that correspond to ProRes 422 and ProRes 422 HQ individual frame sizes.

In simple terms All Intra 400 Mbps would fall short of Apple recommended bit-rate for 422 10 bit colour for circa 92 Mbps is like saying you are missing 0.44 MB from your ProRes 422 frame and 1.6 MB from ProRes 422 HQ and you have 0.3 MB more than ProRes LT however I do not have the full technical details of ProRes to evaluate directly.

The real benefit of such codec is that it can be processed with modest hardware without conversion as the AVC Intra codec is edit ready and each frame is captured individually without any motion artefacts and therefore the computer does not have to do a great deal of work to decode and render the clips.

In order to record All-Intra in your memory card you need a V60 or higher specs card which in terms of $ per GB costs you more than an SSD drive however you no longer need a recorder.

Coming back to the other recording quality option we still need to evaluate how the various long GOP codecs compare relative to each other.

In order to fully understand a codec we need to decompose the GOP into the individual frames and evaluate the information recorded. If you look on Wikipedia it will tell you that P frames are approximately half the size of an I frame and B frame are 25%. I have analysed the Panasonic GH5 clips using ffprobe a component of ffmpeg that tells you what is exactly in each frame to see if this explains some of the people claims that there is no difference between the settings.

Link to Panasonic documentation

 

100 Mbps 420 8 Bits Long Gop 25p Deep Dive

An analysis with ffprobe shows a GOP structure with N=12 and M=3 where N is the length in frames of the group of pictures and M is the distance between I or P frames.

So each Group of Picture is made like this

IBBPBBPBBPBBP before it repeats again.

A size analysis shows that B frames are in average 14% of the I frame and P frames are around 44% of the I frame.

I B B P B B P B B P B B
Size 1648326 247334 237891 728777 231947 228048 721242 228347 227544 713771 236866 232148
Ratio to I frame 100% 15.01% 14.43% 44.21% 14.07% 13.84% 43.76% 13.85% 13.80% 43.30% 14.37% 14.08%

With an average video bit-rate of 94 Mbps each GOP has 45.3 Mbps which means an I Frame has around 13.1 Mbits or 1.57 MB per frame and an equivalent All-Intra bit-rate of approximately 328 Mbps however this codec is using CABAC entropy encoding that Panasonic states is 20-30% more efficient than CAVLC used in All-Intra so net of motion artefacts this codec is pretty strong.

150 Mbps 420 8 Bits Long GOP 50p Deep Dive

An analysis with ffprobe shows a GOP structure with N=24 and M=3 where N is the length in frames of the group of pictures and M is the distance between I or P frames.

So each Group of Pictures is made like this

IBBPBBPBBPBBPBBPBBPBBPBB before it repeats again.

A size analysis shows that B frames are in average 13.4% of the I frame and P frames are around 41% of the I frame. With an average bit-rate of 142.7 Mbps each GOP has 68.5 Mbits which means an I Frame has around 11.3 Mbits or 1.35 MB per frame and an equivalent all Intra bit-rate of approximately 566 Mbps. Again this uses CABAC entropy encoding so the equivalent All-Intra is higher.

One very important aspect of the 150 Mbps codec is that as the GOP is double the length of the single frame rate 100 Mbps codec there are the same number of key frames per second and therefore it is NOT true that this codec is better at predicting motion. In fact it is exactly the same so if you had acquired a 100 Mbps codec at 25 fps and then slowed down the footage to half speed asking your editor to interpolate intermediate frames it would come to the same result although with some more processing required.

150Mbps 422 10 Bits Long Gop 25 fps

An analysis with ffprobe shows a GOP structure with N=12 and M=1 which means this codec does not use B frames but just I and P frames so the GOP structure is as follows:

IPPPPPPPPPPP before it repeats again.

A size analysis shows that P frames are on average 53% of I frames so this codec is in fact less compressed however this has also some consequences.

With an average bitrate of 150 Mbps each GOP has 72 Mbits which means an I Frame has around 10.5 Mbits or 1.25 MB per frame and an equivalent all Intra bitrate of approximately 262 Mbps. So this codec in terms of compression efficiency this is actually the worst and this is due to the lack of B frames.

We can only think that the Panasonic GH5 processing is not strong enough to capture 10 bit and then write 422 Long GOP with IPB structure.

Codec Ranking for Static Image Quality UHD

So in terms of absolute image quality and not taking into account other factors the Panasonic GH5 Movie recording settings ranked by codec quality are as follows:

  1. 400 Mbps 422 10 Bit All intra 25 fps (1.9 MB per frame)
  2. 100 Mbps 420 8 Bit Long Gop 25 fps (1.57 MB per frame)
  3. 150 Mbps 420 8 Bit Long Gop 50 fps (1.35 MB per frame)
  4. 150 Mbps 422 10 Bit Long Gop 25 fps (1.25 MB per frame)

The 100 Mbps  and 400 Mbps codec are marginally different (21% larger frame size) with the 422 10 Bits long GOP really far away.

Conclusion

If you want to record your footage to the internal memory card you are really left with two choices:

  1. Use the 100 Mbps Long Gop codec it is very efficient in the compression and the perceived quality is very good. It does however require you to convert to ProRes or similar during editing if you don’t want to overload your computer as the codec is really heavy on H264 features. You need to get the exposure and white balance right in camera as the clips may not withstand extensive corrections. There is a risk with footage with a lot of motion of some errors in motion interpolation that can generate artefacts.
  2. Buy a V60 or V90 memory card and use 400 All intra at single frame rate. This will give you edit ready footage of higher quality without motion artefacts, You still need to get exposure and white balance right in camera as the headroom is not so large to allow extensive corrections. The bit-rate and frame size is not sufficient to really give you all the benefits of 422 sampling and 10 bit colour but it will be a good stepping stone to produce good quality rec709 420 8 bit footage.

Generally there appears to be no benefit using the internal 422 10 Bit codec nor the 420 8 bit double frame rate due to the limitations of the GOP structure, here Panasonic has created a few options that to be honest appear more a marketing effort than anything else.

There may be some use to the 150 Mbps double frame rate if you intend to slow down the footage after the conversion to ProRes or similar but the extremely long GOP does not make this codec particularly robust to scenes with a lot of motion and in any case not more robust than the 100 Mbps codec.

A final thought if you are interested in 10 bit colour is that the FHD All Intra 200 Mbps codec has enough quality and headroom to allow manipulation. This is in fact the only codec that has bit-rate higher than ProRes HQ at least at 24 and 25 fps so if you want to check the real range of colours and dynamic range the camera is capable of you should try this codec.

Note: I have removed some comments on ProRes and external recorders as there are plenty of people that believe that the intra codec does better than ProRes HQ on the Atomos

Panasonic GH5 the gateway to 4K HDR Video

It has been a while I have been busy with some personal stuff and to be frank not much has been happening the Underwater Video or Still scene that was of interest to me until pretty much September 2017 when Panasonic released the 2.0 version of the DC-GH5 firmware.

The link to the firmware updates is here and here is link to the full PDF

The section we are interested is this one

4K HDR video recording

– [HLG] (Hybrid Log Gamma) is added to [Photo Style]. HDR (High Dynamic Range) is a mode to reproduce both bright part and dark part in an image, making it look just as human eyes see. The camera records video with a designated gamma curve compatible with ITU-R BT.2100, and you can now choose Hybrid Log Gamma (HLG) in [Photo Style].
– A low-bit-rate recording mode 4K HEVC for HLG was added. This enables playback on AV equipment compatible with the HEVC compression format, such as Panasonic 4K HDR TVs.

 

In the PDF we read this additional information

Recording of HDR (High Dynamic Range) motion pictures in HLG (Hybrid Log Gamma) format is now supported. With this format, you can record bright images susceptible to overexposure with more natural colors than is possible with conventional formats.
• “HLG” is a standardized HDR video format that converts and expands the dynamic range of

compressed high-luminance image data on a supported device.
• The monitor and viewfinder of the camera are not capable of displaying images in HLG format. • HDR images appear darker on devices that do not support the HLG format.

If you have headache to understand what is HLG and how it differs from other HDR formats search on the internet the following short document from BBC may help.

 

Why does HDR matter and what can I do to record HDR?

HDR matters because the human eye is more sensible to contrast and colours than resolution. In majority of cases if you do a blind test of UHD 4K footage to anyone sitting at the recommended seating distance for cinema at home (look up SMPTE seating distance) nobody can actually see differences between HD and UHD and this is because the ability of the human eye to resolve pixels is limited by our visual acuity. So why does a YouTube video in 4K looks better than HD? Simply because the bitrate is higher and this means the quality is higher but if you look at your own 4K footage at home and scale it down to HD with good quality you are not able to tell the difference.

However try now some HDR material if you have Amazon or Netflix or even on YouTube and have a compatible Tv set the difference to normal content is staggering. This is because a normal REC709 (the standard for HDTV) display has 6 stops of dynamic range. There are no official figures of how many stops is REC2020 for HDR but good Tv sets are capable of around 10 stops. Now that is a big difference especially on the bright part of the image which is where the HDR displays really excel.

So HDR does matter more than 4K UHD in fact Sony has just produced an HD set HDR capable not sure there will be many of those but this gives an idea.

So how do I record HDR and why there are no HDR certified cameras but only certified displays? The answer is pretty easy you need a camera that offers more than 10 stops dynamic range in video and that is where our Panasonic DC-GH5 comes into the picture.

The camera is capable of 13 stops dynamic range but what is more important it can produce around 8 eV even at ISO 12800 so in essence the camera is well above what is required for REC709 and it can get to around ISO 3200 and still produce nearly 10 stops which is great. So if you have a Panasonic GH5 you have a sensor that is capable of producing the required dynamic range.

However this is not sufficient the camera needs to be able to product at least 10 bit colour depth, an image resolution of 3840×2160 and a colour palette aligned to BT.2020 specifications (wide colour gamut) and finally have the appropriate transfer function to deliver the signal. Majority of commercial cameras are not capable to deliver 10 bit colour depth and do not have a compatible transfer function. The GH4 predecessor of the GH5 was already capable of delivering 10 bit colour to an external recorder using the HDMI output now the GH5 makes this available in camera for recording on SD card at bit rate of 150 mbps IPB and 400 mbps all intra H.264.

HLG vs VLOG and why it matters

Before the firmware 2.0 the only way to produce HDR out of the GH5 was to buy the VLOG upgrade and then attempt to use the recording feature of the camera or an external recorder with Prores 422 or 422 HQ and then take a trip into grading. The reality is that once you crammed the VLOG dynamic range into a REC709 format you essentially limit yourself to 6 stops and therefore waste majority of your effort. So in order to extract real dynamic range you need to output in HDR that is possible but not so easy to do. In practical terms unless you are producing a documentary you will soon give up using vlog underwater because it is just too much work. Here now comes HLG so what is good about HLG and why this can make a real difference here my list:

  1. It is free you don’t need to pay for an upgrade
  2. It is backward compatible with standard dynamic range
  3. Requires a less intensive workflow compared to Vlog
  4. You can produce a decent file recording in camera without external recorders
  5. If you do have an HDR capable external recorder than it shows things are they are and not the washed out version of vlog

This is just my personal list of reasons there may be more.

How to set the Panasonic GH5 to record in HLG and UHD

There are 3 settings that give you the possibility to record HLG HDR compatible files, two are available in MP4 (LPCM) and MOV and one in MP4 (HEVC).

MP4 (LPCM) and MOV

P1040940
400 mbps ALL Intra

P1040941
150 Mbps LongGOP

There are not many cards that can work at 400 mbps and they are expensive. In any case do not assume that 400 mbps ALL-intra is better than longGOP as longGOP is fairly efficient and if you look into the various YouTube videos you will see it is very hard to see any difference unless you do pixel peeping.

MP4 (HEVC)

There is also a convenient low bit rate format available that uses HEVC in camera you can access it selecting MP4 (HEVC) in the REC FORMAT menu

P1040942

You then have this option available

P1040943

Tests show that when done real time HEVC produces files 50% of H.264 so the bitrate makes sense however unless you want to play the files directly on your Tv this is not such a good choice as the files are too hard to edit with any computer as there are no H265 hardware accelerated display widely available.

So the format of choice is as follows:

REC FORMAT: MP4 (LPCM)

REC QUALITY 422/10 bit/LongGOP 150 mbps

Please note the format at 50/60p does not give HLG in camera only the HDMI output is HLG compatible this is because the output is 10 bit as required by HLG. 8 bit colour does NOT qualify for UHD HDR so if you use this format in camera the HLG photo style will be greyed out.

How to convert 150 mbps HLG LongGOP files

At time of writing only programs like VLC play the H264 10 bit files produced by the GH5 and on my computer they play badly. So when you will go and edit those files your NLE program will most likely convert them into a format that is easier to digest and still supports 422 10 bit colour, this format is Apple Prores.

Unfortunately unless you have a paid software the files will only be unreadable if you use DaVinci Resolve or iMovie. However you can use a command line encoder like ffmpeg and convert all those files for free.

The command once you have the executable and you have the files in the right directory is something like this:

ffmpeg -i GH5file.mp4  -c:v prores -c:a copy GH5file.mov

This tells ffmpeg to transcode the video to prores 422 and to just copy the file as is (prores uses linear PCM for audio) here you notice that the source file has mp4 and the destination mov that is the default for prores and the reason to set your GH5 to record mp4 and not mov.

I have developed an automator script that is able to convert all selected files in the memory card and place them in a location of choice on the hard disk or else.

automator

Ffmpeg will convert using prores 422 that in my case bumped the files from 150mps to 474 mbps as prores is an all intra codec this is reasonable and there is no reason to use higher version like 422 HQ starting from a 150 mbps longGOP. Obviously if you use an external recorder feel free to use the higher bitrate available.

How to produce your HDR video clip for free

DaVinci Resolve is able to use your prores files converted from the GH5 and produce HDR compatible files.

You need to go into project settings and select colour management and change your settings as shown here

DaVinciProjectSettings

Colour Space Rec.2020 and Gamma Rec.2100 HLG will produce a file that on a compatible Tv will trigger HDR.

Now the bad news if you don’t have an HDR monitor it is very hard to grade properly on a standard monitor although you can look at luminance curves and chroma curves to see if you have situation of bad exposure or saturation this can be tricky with underwater footage so the trick is to try and get it right in camera.

Of particular interest is the HLG View Assist setting on the GH5: as the screen of the camera is not HDR this should help exposing the scene properly but I have to yet determine what is the setting that I prefer.

Well that is all for now…!